de ereprijs

Op 6 september 2011 speelde orkest de ereprijs olv Wim Boerman in Utrecht, tijdens de Gaudeamus Muziekweek, een programma met onder meer werk van jonge componisten die hadden deelgenomen aan de Young Composers’ Meeting in Apeldoorn in het voorjaar van 2011 – deze website heeft daaraan toen ook aandacht besteed. De bezetting van de ereprijs (zonder hoofdletters!): fluit, klarinet, saxofoon, tuba, trombone, trompet, hoorn, piano, elektrische gitaar, basgitaar, slagwerk en zes zangeressen, en als solist contrabassist Lukasz Owczynnikow (in het stuk van Wielecki). De toelichtingen zijn van Linnea Semmerling.

1.Ryan Latimer: Rotten Music
*1990, UK

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In this piece for large amplified ensemble classical music is not only encountering its other, but employing it, interacting with it, punning on it. We are entering a show music sphere, never quite sure how serious to take it, but however, inevitably dragged along. The show music tunes and jazzy improvisations start to swing above a layered rhythmic structure. Women are chanting, the sounds of different worlds are blurring until an alto rises from the turmoil. We are let loose one last time until two ecstatic saxophones close the scene. Music in decay?

2. Thierry Tidrow: Silk Hole
* 1986, CA

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Again we find ourselves in two worlds, the first few seconds show it with its triumphantly clear start fading into dissonances and ambiguous overtones. Time and again we return to an unstable, irregular sound tapestry of tittering, mumbling, shrieking voices and instruments. We enter a bright world of swing and film tunes, only to return time and again to the tapestry. The female voice parts curiously correlate with the sound of the flute, a superficial conversations in the brightest of tones arises and grows ever more excited and yet pointless it seems. So?

3. Tadeusz Wielecki: The Time of the Stones
*1954, PL

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It appears to be a matter of gravity. It is sinking down, in circles it seems. Sucked down by its own weight. Circles emerge on the water around. The waves are moving slower, then faster, then slower again. The sounds of the environment are become ever more dense, but then disperse again. Something is pulled up only to fall again. It is cold above, but ever warmer the deeper it falls. It is falling, falling, falling. All this emerged from just one tremor: a trill.

‘Current music leaves much unsaid, that’s why I identify with it so closely. Something said with finality, in the only possible way, automatically recedes into the past. Music that is truly contemporary represents an effort to make us aware of ourselves, of our fears desires and longings, is just a reminiscence of the past.’ [Tadeusz Wielecki, interview with Marta _ugowska, 1988, trans. Maja Trochimczyk]
as retrieved from http://www.usc.edu/dept/polish_music/composer/wielecki.html on the 14th of October 2011

4. Benjamin Scheuer: Excerpt from the process of creating a Monstrosity
*1987, D

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It’s alive!
It trembles, quivers, shakes and scratches itself. It moves up and down, moves ahead, moves further and further. It is restless. It seems like it grows…
We cannot be sure about its temper, cannot quite come to know whether we might be able to tame it. As soon as we think we know a character trait, it changes again. However, our acoustic gaze remains tied to it. We continue to keep track of it, trying to follow its every move. Wooed by fad.

5. Michael Smetanin: Ouverture voor een Mayakoski-opera
*1985, AU

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It is impossible to withdraw oneself from these large operatic sounds with their variety of references to the classical canon. As an Australian-born son to Russian parents, Smetanin appears to discover the sounds of the Russian musical tradition and folklore through the work of Mayakovski. A rich picture emerges from lasting musical ideas, an original treatment of the instruments together with the remains of a Prokofievian percussion and a kind of ritualistic chant reminiscent of Strawinsky’s ‘Svadebka’.

6. Peter McNamara: Cross Modifications
*1980, AU

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Classical music as a matter of mutual attuning, adjustment and alteration for the better. This piece discovers the range of the in-between, the sphere of subtle distinctions. Sound fields are alluded to, but never really start to sound. After their marcato articulation the tones vibrate for a while with continuously clashing overtones only to disintegrate again into their components until but a solitary voice remains. A plea for what could be.

‘Being someone that has a very introverted personality I believe the reason why I became a composer is that it provides an emotional outlet. It also provides a way to express the timbral sounds conceived by my imagination.’
Peter McNamarra as retrieved from http://www.australianmusiccentre.com.au/artist/mcnamara-peter on the 21st of October 2011.

7. Trevor Grahl: Hussy (winner 2010)
*1984, CA

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A playful collage of the splendid American brass sounds of Meredith Wilson’s 1957 musical ‘The Music Man’ with all its humorous swing, but a little less truth claiming. Grahl’s rendering of the scene remains a caricaturist sketch, fragmented and contingent and hence always just about to flee one’s perception. A rendering of so many stage scenes and characters at once with great drive and vitality, punning on its own rhythms, slurs, twitters, lovely chitchats and heated fights. Winking at us seductively.

‘You have to get to the root of what is there. For this piece, there are various aspects, because it’s not just a musical theatre, there’s also a movie that exists. I used both the movie and the dance version to inspire me. Mostly I took things that were there and put them in the photocopier and make them like twice the size.’

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